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Multiple Selection Betting Options – Know Your Accumulator From A Yankee

If you are someone that likes to bet regularly with bet365 Sport, or indeed any other bookmaking service, then it is likely that you will have come across a type of bet that lets you string several selections together.

Each Way Accumulator of Five Selections At Bet365

These multiple selection bets come in a number of different forms, although by far the most popular is the accumulator and in this article, we are going to take a look at the different types of multiple selection bets you can find at bet365 Sport.

And most usefully of all, we are going to explain what the key differences are between them and why one multiple selection bet of a unit stake of £10 can cost a lot more than another.

But before we look at some of the different multiple selection betting options available at bet365, let’s first examine why you would even want to place a multiple selection bet in the first place.

Why Place A Multiple Selection Bet?

On the face of it, logic seems to dictate that multiple selection bets of any kind reduce the chances of you landing a winner, so why would you want to place one?

The main reason why people like to place multiple selection bets is the fact that they can offer you a much larger return on your stake, than a single bet can.

That’s because with multiple selection bets, your stake from the first winning bet, plus your winnings, carries on into the second bet and if that wins, then you will get paid out at a much higher rate.

For example, let’s say you place a Win Double bet of £10 on two horses to win, Horse A wins at odds of 8/1 which means that you win £80 and get your £10 stake money back.

That means that on the second horse, you have a £90 stake placed on it so let’s now say that horse wins, this time at 6/1.

This offers you a payout of 6x£90, which is £540, plus you would also get your £90 stake back for a total return of £630, from a single £10 bet.

Extrapolating from that, using an accumulator system, you can see how picking this type of multiple selection bets can turn even a very small unit stake, into a sizeable return if you are lucky enough to keep picking and landing the winners.

It is this promise of a big return for a small stake which is the real appeal of multiple selection bets of all types.

Speaking of which, let’s now identify some of the most popular multiple selection bets you can find at bet365 Sport and many other betting sites.

Multiple Selection Bets

  • Double, Treble & Accumulator Bets (To Win & Each Way)
Five-fold accumulator

Although these bets have three names, they all represent the same kind of bet, just different numbers of selections on each.

With any of these three bets all your selections must win in order for you to win the bet.

A Double bet refers to a bet in which there are two selections that must win, a treble is for three selections that must win and an accumulator is generally used for four or more selections that must win, but Doubles and Trebles are also a form of accumulator too as they operate in exactly the same way.

Accumulator bets can also be known by another name, an X-fold bet, where X is the number of selections on your accumulator.

For example, an accumulator with five selections required to win would be known as a five-fold bet.

In the screenshot, you can see an example of a five-fold bet and how the odds on the bet accumulate to give you a potentially huge return (£5,359.92) for just a £10 stake.  

You can also opt to make your accumulator bet an each way double, treble or accumulator by clicking the box at the bottom of the bet slip (shown in the first image on this page).

This doubles the stake of your bet to £20 as you have to cover both the win portion of the bet and the place portion of the bet with one unit stake (which is £10). So two bets covered means a £20 stake.

This bet means that if one or more of your selections doesn’t win the race, but is placed, then while you won’t win the win portion of your bet, you will win the place portion.

Of course, if your selections all win, then you win both the win portion of the bet and the each way portion too which will offer slightly better odds than the standard win-only accumulator.

We are now going to use the same five selections to show you some other less commonly used multiple bets available at bet365.

  • Banker Bets
Banker Bet

One of the options you can use is a Banker Bet. This option sees you select one, or more, of your selections as a banker, that means that this selection must win before any payout is guaranteed.

Once you have selected your banker or bankers in a race, you can then decide what other selections to pair with it.

There are multiple options available as you can see on the bet slip (listed as 1B + 1/4, 1B + 2/4, 1B + 3/4 and 1B 4/4).

These are simply the different winning combinations you can back with your unit stake.

1B + 1/4 simply means you need your banker selection to win and then one of any of the other four selections to win in order to generate a return (of course if more win, then you’d win on those selections too).

However, you can also see that to fully cover all permutations in this bet, you need to place four bets; One on your Banker and Horse A, one on your Banker and Horse B and so on.

With five selections on your slip with one banker, this means you need to cover four lines, so for a £10 unit stake bet this would cost you £40.

You can then assume from this that the other betting options involve returns if your Banker bet wins and two other horses win, then three other horses, then finally all four other horses.

You can choose to back any one of these options, or bet on them all to cover every eventuality. However, to do that with a £10 unit stake would cost you £150.

  • Full Cover Bets
Multiple Selection Betting Options At Bet365 Including FulL Cover & Full Cover With Singles Bets

Full Cover Bets are similar to Banker Bets, but they don’t require you to name one selection as a banker, but they do permit you to land a win if not all of your selections were to win the race.

Full Cover Bets have different names based on the number of selections on each bet.

  • Trixie – 3 selections
  • Yankee – 4 selections
  • Canadian or Super Yankee – 5 selections
  • Heinz – 6 selections
  • Super Heinz – 7 selections
  • Goliath – 8 selections.

So in our example, you can see with five selections, we would be using a Canadian or as it is sometimes called, a Super Yankee full cover bet.

With this bet, every possible combination of two winners or more on your bet slip will need to be covered and as you can see on the bet slip, the number of lines you need to cover with a Super Yankee bet is 26, which for a £10 unit stake would be a bet of £260.

You would only need two of the five horses selected to win to guarantee a return, and the more horses of your selections that win, the more of those 26 lines would be winners and the greater your return would be.

  • Full Cover With Singles

Full Cover With Singles bets are almost the same as standard full cover bets, only with this bet, you also cover each selection on your bet slip as a single bet to win too.

So in the case above, we know a standard Full Cover bet has 26 lines, so with five horses on our bet slip, this would mean a Full Cover With Singles bet would require 31 lines to be covered, so would cost £310 for our £10 unit stake.

Full Cover With Singles bets also have their own names, mostly based on the number of lines covered in that bet:

  • Patent – 3 selections
  • Lucky 15 – 4 selections
  • Lucky 31 – 5 selections
  • Lucky 63 – 6 selections

These are not the exhaustive list of different multiple selection bets you can make at bet365, but they are a solid grounding in the different betting options available when you want to make multiple selections on your bet slip.

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